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In Arabic, we have a terminology "التغذية البصرية" which literally means "Visual Nutrition".

It means basically to develop an artistic eyes by looking into other people's photographs (or art in general), hence kind of reach a saturated status of art visualizing to be able to produce better art or just simply learn from the others (e.g. browsing through Flickr or Instagram for photographers).

What is the correct respective terminology in English?

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    I don't think this is necessarily off-topic, with the photographic context given. But, it would definitely be on topic at english.stackexchange.com – mattdm Dec 1 '18 at 14:11
  • I find this interesting because an antonym leaps to mind: eye candy tends to be visually appealing without being visually nutritious. – Gary Botnovcan Dec 3 '18 at 21:17
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A similar expression in English slang would refer to a practiced eye or a trained eye. It's a noun.

Definition of practiced eye according to Merriam-Webster:

1 : a lot of knowledge about and experience with the way something looks
His practiced eye told him one of the diamonds was a fake.
2 : someone who has a lot of knowledge about and experience with the way something looks
The diamonds may look identical to you and me, but to a practiced eye, one is obviously a fake.

  • Stan, I do not think this answer the question as the expression do not involve the pleasure and joy of looking on the photos. The expression in my language is *nutrition for the eyes" – Romeo Ninov Dec 1 '18 at 21:05
  • @RomeoNinov The given definition fits the description the OP gave in the question. "Pleasure and joy…" is not absent from the issue; but, a high level of visual sophistication (saturated status) is implied. This question is waaaaaaay off topic here with your comment which places it in a language context rather than in photography.stackexchange one. – Stan Dec 2 '18 at 3:00

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