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Here is the sentence:

Whether you’ve just unpacked a new iPad, or you’re helping someone out with theirs, here are some of the apps you shouldn’t be without.

The text is a description of essential apps. I found the following meanings of the phrase "help someone out" on the Free Dictionary:

  1. To aid someone in doing something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Can you help out with the bake sale? Oh sure, I can help you out with that.

  2. To give or provide someone with something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Any chance you can help me out with the name of a good plumber? If you need money for the tip, I can help you out with a few dollars.

  3. To help someone or something to remove something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Please help Grandma out of her coat.

  4. To help someone or something to physically get out of some thing or place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." I had to help the scared dog out of the cage.

I am not sure if the act of helping out concerns opening a new box or buying new iPad. Any suggestions or comments?

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The sentence should be:

Whether you’ve just unpacked a new iPad, or you’re helping someone out with theirs, here are some of the apps you shouldn’t be without.

It's the either/or construction, but the word "or" had been left out by mistake.

Your sentence uses the phrase "help out" in the first sense you listed. Suppose you've unpacked your new iPad and are ready to start using it, or you're helping someone out with [their iPad]. In that case, you might need to install some app or another, right?

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