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I've seen at least one blog entry that used a bytecode hack to replace a CALL opcode immediately before a RETURN opcode with a jump to the top of the function body.

I looked up the word "entry" on google translate. It means

an item written or printed in a diary, list, ledger, or reference book

in such a case. But it seems not a must. If we remove it from the above sentence, it doesn't affect the sentence's meaning yet. So why do we put it there?

10

Without the word entry in your given example, the phrase would be referring to the blog as a whole, i.e. that the person has seen at least one blog out of many blogs which used such a bytecode hack.

Whereas, the inclusion of the word entry indicates that the person is referring to one particular item within a blog which may contain many items.

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6

You definitely don't want to remove it because the meaning will be completely different. A blog is basically a website that contains a number of articles (you can call them blog articles since they all appear in a blog). A blog entry then would be just one of those blog articles. So, saying:

I've seen at least one blog that used a bytecode hack to replace a CALL opcode immediately before a RETURN opcode with a jump to the top of the function body.

would mean that you're talking about a blog as a website instead of a particular article (blog entry) from that blog.

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