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I have a question reharding the usage of gerunds. Are the following senteces correct? If not, Can you expalin why?

  • Before finishing the project, you need to finish your homework.

  • Before your finishing the project, you need to finish your homework.

I know for the above I can say:

  • Before you finish the project, you need to finish your homework.

But when I try to use gerunds, the problem arises.

Another example using gerunds:

  • John there's a good show going on the TV on career making. Watch It before Its ending.

I know I can say:

  • John there's a good show going on the TV on career making. Watch It before It ends.

Can anyone who is a teacher or good knowledge of the language please explain how I should use gerunds In those sentences?

Thanks in advance.

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This sentence is correct:

Before finishing the project, you need to finish your homework.

A rule when using a gerund phrase as an introductory phrase to a sentence is that the action of the gerund must always be done by the subject of the main clause of the sentence, which is 'you' here. It is therefore redundant to use 'your' as well before the gerund, and it sounds wrong to do so. In contrast, the 'you' is needed in the 'before you finish' version of the sentence.

The 'its ending' is not a gerund. It is a present particle of a verb, and they are frequently used as nouns or adjectives. In this sentence, 'ending' is functioning as a noun. That sentence is not ungrammatical but it sounds odd. Most speakers would prefer 'it ends' instead. I cannot explain why. It may be nothing more than a natural tendency of speakers to choose the simplest form of words to express an idea.

But that entire example sounds strange. I would use something like:

John, there's a good show about career making on the TV now. Watch it before It ends.

Note the comma after 'John' is needed. Forms of address are always separated from the main body of sentences in dialogue.

Note how 'career making' only modifies 'show', so place it next to that. In contrast, there are two adverbial phrases, 'on the TV' and 'now', which apply to the whole sentence. The usual place for those is tacked onto the end of the sentence.

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