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It has to do with pollution that I feel tired.

I am making this statement negative now. But, which one is correct?

It doesn't have to do with this.
It won't have to do with this.

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  • There are some usages for "...not because of pollution" (google.com/…) So you might also consider "I'm tired not because of pollution." – Graduate Mar 14 '14 at 6:15
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In my opinion, these three sentences sound more natural:

  1. Pollution doesn't have to do with the fact that I feel tired.
  2. Feeling tired has nothing to do with the fact that there is pollution.
  3. Pollution has nothing to do with my feeling tired.
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We make sentences negative by keeping the same tense.

It has to do with pollution that I feel tired

can be...

It does not have to do with pollution that I feel tired.

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  • This is, I believe, another difference between Indian and Anglo-American English. Idiomatic AAE no longer allows have to forego DO-support when it is used (as here) as a lexical verb rather than an auxiliary, although this was permitted down to about the middle of the last century. You must say "It does not have to do with ...". Alternatively, however, you may say "It has nothing to do with ...". Incidentally, none of these would be idiomatic in AmE; we would say "My feeling tired has nothing to do with pollution." – StoneyB on hiatus Mar 10 '14 at 11:05
  • @StoneyB trust me. It has nothing to do... was my choice but then I referred a few statements and changed it accordingly. – Maulik V Mar 10 '14 at 11:06

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