14

Which one is correct? (Maybe both are correct.)

He passed away on the morning of March 5.

Or

He passed away in the morning of March 5.

  • It's so strange to see, that no-one provided specific rules or references after several years of the question being open, and everything is based on "IMO"... weird. There are specific rules in English for this case, when talk about a specific morning, afternoon, or when we describe the part of the day. – Farside Apr 22 '16 at 9:55
14

In your sentences, on is the correct preposition and in is the incorrect one. This is a bit tricky.

"He passed away on March 5" is correct. "He passed away in the morning" is also correct. However, in your sentence, "the morning of" functions as an adjectival phrase modifying March 5, so "He passed away on the morning of March 5" is also correct.

If we turn things around a bit it may help to make things a bit more clear: since "he passed away on March 5 in the morning" is correct, it follows that "he passed away in the morning on March 5" is also correct.

  • Thank you so much. It makes sense and you got a reason as well. I agree with you. – user62015 Mar 11 '14 at 5:03
  • Actually it is "the morning" that is being modified by the "March 5," with the use of "of." Another example of this, The Mountain of Honeylily, you can say The Honeylily Mountain, with the "Honeylily" modifying the "Mountain." I'm not really sure, please reply if I'm wrong. – Xyenz Aug 1 '17 at 9:56
  • @Xyenz That sounds right to me too. – BobRodes Aug 9 '17 at 3:07
3

You say "in the morning/in the afternoon/in the evening". These indications of time stand alone and the concept is in + period of time.

It is another thing for "on the morning of the first of May". Here the concept of date/on this day prevails and has become the accepted expression.

1

Well, it seems none of the answers explain why is it like that, what are the rules, what's the usage, and no-one provided references. I will elaborate and will post my investigation, as I did here at ELU.

Just to cut the long story short, for this specific case: "on" is the correct preposition and "in" is the incorrect one.

"The morning of" functions as an adjectival phrase clarifying the specific time and date "on March 5". "On" is used because it belongs to the date here, specific part of the day.

The normal language constructions would be:

  • on + date (with the year or without it) or day of the week
  • in + morning, afternoon, evening (in the morning, in the evening)

But, when we talk about a specific morning, afternoon, or when we describe the part of the day it should be used with on:

  • on the morning of [date],

You can't say "I will see you on the morning" - it's incorrect.

here's the reference for more examples: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/at-on-and-in-time

In or on?

We use in with morning, afternoon, evening and night, but we use on when we talk about a specific morning, afternoon, etc., or when we describe the part of the day.

0

He passed away in the morning on March 5 - is correct.

We use in for mornings, months and years, and on for dates. We use on for the days (Monday, Tuesday...etc). We use at for time (At 7 o'clock in the morning on Sunday in March...for example).

Further reading here.

  • Thanks for your help and I agree with you. I understand that but I just read on Yahoo so just wanted to confirm. – user62015 Mar 10 '14 at 10:59
  • @user62015 You are welcome. Don't consider everything that you find on the Internet an authentic source! – Maulik V Mar 10 '14 at 11:05
  • @user62015 Oh, looking at your profile, I remember you now! You're the one who finds flaws in Yahoo! :) No offense please! haha – Maulik V Mar 10 '14 at 11:10
  • Thanks, haha but I am not after Yahoo. It is a good source to check out news and when I read something, which I have not read yet so I ask generally. You and other people have been very helpful to me. – user62015 Mar 10 '14 at 11:39
0

On + "noun which is a time label stands for a long time( usually one day / one month )"

on Saturday : Are you free on Saturday to come for a dinner?
on Monday

In + "the" +"noun which is a time label stands for a short time( usually some point of the day)"

in the morning: he is the type who would wake up in the morning.


Why do you see "On the morning"?

this is mostly comes from " on Monday morning ". but "On the morning" is incorrect.

0

In the second, minute, hour, morning, afternoon, evening, night, day, week, month, year, decade, century and millenium using "in" means within or during. On the second, minute, hour, morning, afternoon, evening, night, day and week using "on" means a specific moment in time. For a specific month, year, decade, century or millennium, on is dropped and only the definite article is needed. THE month, year, decade, century or millennium is indicated as a specific time period and on becomes redundant.

-1

These both sound weird to me. I would reword to:

He passed away in the morning on March 5

or

He passed away during the morning of March 5

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