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I wrote:

MD simulations can help [to] gain molecular-level insights into the behavior of solutes in a specific biphasic system.

I'm not sure if it is "help gain" or "help to gain", or maybe "help gaining"; the second sounds more natural to me. I know we can say "help me find/gain/etc." but saying "help find/gain/etc." sounds odd to me. Could you please say what is the rule for these cases (with and without an object)

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Note the the use of gerund suggests a different connotation:

Help can be followed by either a gerund or a (to-)infinitive but with different meanings:

I can't help thinking that you are hiding something. (only in the negative: I have to think that you are hiding something.)

Could you help me (to) undo my shoelaces? My fingers are frozen. (Could you undo my shoelaces?)

Help can be followed by a bare infinitive or a to-infinitive.

  • Thank you but you still didn't answer my question. My example have no object between the "help" and the following verb. Can you say, for example, "This help find a solution" – Ahmad Dec 7 '18 at 14:06
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    @Ahmad - as stated in the answer, you can use both to-infinitive or bare infinitive. See also : books.google.com/ngrams/… – user070221 Dec 7 '18 at 14:09
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    @Ahmad It doesn't matter. You could have written "MD simulations can help you gain molecular-level insights into the behavior of solutes in a specific biphasic system." I would go with the bare infinitive. – user3169 Dec 8 '18 at 0:00

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