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I wrote:

As XX pointed out, either of this mechanism is possible. So, at this point, we can’t be sure which one is the case in our work.

I didn't find many results of "which one is the case" on google! So, it made me wonder if it is an idiomatic phrase to use?

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    "either of these mechanisms"
    – user3169
    Dec 8 '18 at 21:07
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"Which one is the case" is perfectly idiomatic. In this context, however, it might be a little clearer to say "which mechanism applies."

"Either of this mechanism" is not idiomatic.

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  • Either of these mechanisms. Dec 8 '18 at 19:09
  • Ahh. I see. I have deleted my prior comment. Dec 9 '18 at 20:25
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"To be the case" means 'to be so' and is used to say that a previously explicitly stated possibility is, was, or will be true, e.g. I thought that Joe might be drunk, and smelling his breath told me that this was the case. To use the phrase in your sentence, you would have to rewrite it. As XX pointed out, either mechanism A or mechanism B applies. So, at this point, we can’t be sure which is the case in our work.

Case (Oxford)

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