2
  1. Has it got anything to do with this?
  2. Has it got something to do with this?
  3. Has it something to do with this?
  4. Has it anything to do with this?

I am not sure which is correct and natural in English. The immediate context is:

You look tired, has it got anything to do with air pollution?

2

As a native AE speaker, I would probably say "Does it have anything to do with air pollution?"

  • 2
    Or "Does it have something to do with ...". I think both versions, anything or something, or common and valid. "Has it anything to do with ..." is valid but sounds archaic. – Jay Mar 10 '14 at 21:04
0

As a native BrE speaker, I would probably say Is it anything to do with this? (or "something" - they're normally about equal and interchangeable). But AmE does seem to favour get in such constructions.

Per @Jay's comment, OP's versions #3 and #4 are dated/formal (archaic is putting it a bit strong).


In some related contexts, there are different implications regarding anything/something. For example,...

"I hear you found a dead body near my house, officer..."
"...is that anything to do with me?" (implies denial of involvement - "It's nothing to do with me")
"...is that something to do with me?" (implies a genuine enquiry - "Is it someone I know, perhaps?")

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