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Harry rolled over in bed, a series of dazzling new pictures forming in his mind's eye….He had hoodwinked the impartial judge into believing he was seventeen.…he had become Hogwarts champion…he was standing on the grounds, his arms raised in triumph in front of the whole school, all of whom were applauding and screaming…he had just won the Triwizard Tournament. Cho's face stood out particularly clearly in the blurred crowd, her face glowing with admiration….

Harry grinned into his pillow, exceptionally glad that Ron couldn't see what he could.

There are few things I don't get from that sentence:

  1. What does "grinned into his pillow" mean? Is it his face burying into his pillow while grinning or something?

  2. Why did Harry feel exceptionally glad that Ron couldn't see what he could? Is it because Harry felt shy about it?

Can anyone help me to understand it?

  • Question #2 asks for interpretation, so it's off-topic here. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 11 '18 at 13:12
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo, just curious about what 'reading' or "reading comprehension" tag does in this site. – dan Dec 11 '18 at 13:28
  • There are many antediluvian tags on the site. But the rules are pretty clear about questions of interpretation. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 11 '18 at 13:39
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    felt not feeled, BTW. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 11 '18 at 15:25
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What does "grinned into his pillow" mean? Is it his face burying into his pillow while grinning or something?

Sounds like a correct interpretation to me. It might not exactly be literal (Harry could be lying on the side facing the pillow rather than smothering himself with it), but that's the general gist of it.

Why did Harry feel exceptionally glad that Ron couldn't see what he could? Is it because Harry feeled shy about it?

I've read Harry Potter ages ago, but I remember one of the themes was Ron being envious of Harry getting into the tournament. So perhaps Harry wouldn't want Ron to see himself mentally gloating about it.

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The usual collocations are cried | wept | sobbed into his | her pillow.

You've understood it correctly.

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