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We have three shapes in my study. We called them trees. The class of Tree 1 is larger than the class of tree 2 and tree 3. Also, the shape of tree 1 contains the shapes of both tree 2 and tree 3. I would like to compare them and show that tree 2 and tree 3 are contained in tree 1. Here is my try:

The class of tree 1 is larger than the one of the second and third tree, containing both of them.

or

The class of tree 1 is larger than the one of the second and third tree and contains both of them.

How can I compare two things and mention the ability of one of them in one sentence?

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    It might help to know what the trees look like. Do they look like (a) these trees? Or (b) these trees? – J.R. Dec 11 '18 at 16:38
  • Consider Class 2 and Class 3 are subclasses of Class 1. More generally, perhaps, X and Y are subsets / subcategories / subtypes of Z. But with the "indirection" of something like The class of Z is broader than the subclasses of X and Y, all you're really saying is "Z is not very precisely defined, but it shares at least some characteristics with X and Y". – FumbleFingers Dec 11 '18 at 17:10
  • Most speakers won't know what you mean by "the class of a tree" or how a class can have dimension or number. They would be confused by "larger". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 11 '18 at 22:19
  • @J.R. I meant (b). – Maryam Dec 12 '18 at 14:44
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A is larger than both B and C.

The x of A is larger than that of both B and C.

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I hope the following samples help you:

The class of tree 1 is larger than the other ones that named tree 2 and tree 3, which are as a subclass of it.

The class of tree 1 is larger than the classes of tree 2 and tree 3, which are as a subclass of it.

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