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This sentence is really confusing for me. I've checked Collins, Oxford, Cambridge, urban… dictionaries, no such collocations.

my guess is "the wind changed" means she senses something bad might happen?? ( so wind means bad things??) if so, or not, then why the face "stick "?? does "stick" mean her expression "fixed", not moving, and why?

and why on earth "mum would use this kind of face to warn me"?? what kind face? is it some kind of face a parent gives to a child who makes a mistake?

here is the sentence:

Her daughter, curled up next to her on the sofa, just glowered—the kind of face Mum used to warn me would stick in place if the wind changed.

the context of the above sentence is: the daughter glowered at "me"–––– a paid carer for the daughter's quadriplegia brother. after "me" suggesting some plan to help the brother, a plan which requires their approval and their financial support.

3

There is a superstition that if you make a sad or angry expression, and the wind changes direction (eg from East to West) then you won't be able to change the expression. Nobody actually believes it is true, but it a quite common idea.

Parents may tell their children "Don't frown. If the wind changes it will stick in place". The quoted passage means her daughter had an angry or sullen expression, the kind of expression that her mother told her not to make because "If the wind changes your face will stick in place".

Another misunderstanding in the question - "the kind of face Mum used to warn me" - it's not referring to the kind of faced Mom used, as in Mom using the face. It means "used to" as in "did in the past". So, "In the past, Mom would warn me that this kind of face would stick..."

On our sister site there is a discussion of the origin of the expression.

  • Another misunderstanding I noticed in the question - "the kind of face Mum used to warn me" - it's not referring to the kind of faced Mom used, as in Mom using the face. It means "used to" as in "did in the past". So, "In the past, Mom would warn me that this kind of face would stick..." – anaximander Dec 12 '18 at 9:45
  • I get it. as : the kind of face/ (Mum used to warn me)/ would stick in place if the wind changed. Then I have another question, what kind of clause is it of "Mum used to warn me" ? Certainly not an attributive clause now, ? – user86301 Dec 12 '18 at 12:15

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