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"I feel like anything I say, as simple be it may, you're gonna like me". Is the previous sentence grammatically correct? What is the phrase between the two commas usually referred to as? What exactly does this phrase me and if it is, how is it different from "as simple as it is"?

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"I feel like anything I say, as simple be it may, you're gonna like me".

This sentence is like a string tied in knots. Let's try to unravel it.

Slightly reword the first part, as follows:

I feel like anything I say, as simple as it may be...

This mean "Anything I say, even if it's simple."

Then, it seems like the word "regardless" needs to be added. In other words: "regardless of how simply I speak, you are going to like me."

Has that clarified the meaning?

To answer your questions:

Is the previous sentence grammatically correct?

No.

What is the phrase between the two commas usually referred to as?

"As", "because" and "since" are conjunctions. "As", "because" and "since" all introduce subordinate clauses.

What exactly does this phrase mean?

See earlier comments.

how is it different from "as simple as it is"?

Mainly, not different... However, "may be" indicates something which is "possible", whereas "it is" represents the simple present verb tense.

  • Thanks for the reply. So I understand that it is not grammatically correct. But is there any reordering of words between the two commas that might make it grammatically correct? Even adding or removing a few words is okay. – Anoop Mysore Dec 16 '18 at 7:40
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    @AnoopMysore , yes. Something which I mentioned in the answer is that "as simple be it may" can be reworded to "as simple as it may be", and then it is grammatical. However, looking to the final section of the sentence, you could then say "...will be enough for you to like me". In other words, the puzzle is attaching the last part. – Sam Dec 16 '18 at 8:05

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