1

Please check the sentences and let me know, if they are correct or not.

I had tea in the morning.

I had a cup of tea in the morning.

I took tea in the morning.

I took a cup of tea in the morning.

I drank tea in the morning.

I drank a cup of tea in the morning.

Thanks in advance.

closed as off-topic by snailcar, starsplusplus, nxx, Hellion, StoneyB Mar 13 '14 at 14:52

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified. See: Alternative websites for proofreading" – snailcar, starsplusplus, nxx, Hellion, StoneyB
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6

All of those lines are correct but some don't feel quite right. This morning, or most mornings would be a better choice in a lot of those lines than "in the morning". More on that in a moment.

To say "I took tea" brings to mind a snooty, aristocratic woman telling the hired help that she will take her tea in the drawing room this afternoon, thank you. That's an American's take on it, you may get a totally different response here from a Brit. Viva la differance.

To say the same things, I would choose:

I had tea this morning.

I had a cup of tea this morning.

I have tea in the morning. -OR- I have tea most mornings. -OR- I have tea every morning.

(again) I had tea this morning.

I drank tea this morning. -OR- I drink tea most mornings. -OR- I drink tea every morning.

I drank a cup of tea this morning

In real life, I'm a coffee drinker. :)

  • the OP's asking whether these sentences are correct. He does not ask our way of saying them! I think you should write each sentence and then give your opinion with reason. If the sentence is incorrect, simply say it. – Maulik V Mar 13 '14 at 7:42
  • I said that the sentences that he put out were correct, but that I would chose to say them differently. The originals don't feel quite right. I'd be more than happy to get further into it, but since he wasn't very specific in his question I don't have a specific problem to address. – Jolenealaska Mar 13 '14 at 7:47
  • 2
    @Maulik - RE: If the sentence is incorrect, simply say it. I disagree wholeheartedly. Some sentences can be technically correct, yet still sound outdated, stilted, or awkward; other sentences can sound natural yet be grammatically flawed. "Correct" can mean different things to different people. I have no problem with an answer that begins with "All of those lines are correct but some don't feel quite right" – even when the O.P. only inquires about "correctness." – J.R. Mar 13 '14 at 15:34

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.