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From a grammatical viewpoint, we can say the following sentence:

I haven't got (= don't have) a car, but my sister has.

I want to know can we say the following rather than the above one?

I haven't got (= don't have) a car, but my sister has got.

  • Haven't got is not the same thing as don't have. For example: I don't have a car, but my sister does. – Jason Bassford Dec 18 '18 at 2:17
  • I cannot understand your mean! In grammatical books have written haven't got = don't have. Actually, have got is common in the spoken. @Jason Bassford – M. Afrashteh Dec 18 '18 at 22:52
  • I do not have and I have not got are not grammatically identical. If you have read any grammar books that say they are identical, they are very poor books indeed. – Jason Bassford Dec 18 '18 at 22:59
  • @Jason Bassfor I don't think "Essential Grammar in Use" is a poor book! s9.picofile.com/file/8346175050/2018_12_19_045104.jpg – M. Afrashteh Dec 19 '18 at 1:25
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Yes, but it's awkward. The verb "to have got" usually takes an object, so it looks a little strange to just leave it hanging:

I haven't got a car, but my sister has got one.

This is repetitive, so most native speakers would just say:

I haven't got a car, but my sister has (one).

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