1

The whole sentence is as follows:

I am wondering whether I have to write the paper regarding Canada or some other countries as well.

The main point of uncertainty is after 'or'. I am trying to express whether the paper is acceptable only when I write about Canada or if I may also write about other countries.

1

As with the other answers, I think it sounds more natural to use if and about. So, I'll use those in my own answer.

That aside, I find the real issue to be one of semantics. (It's grammatical but also a little confusing.)

When you use or in your sentence, it's easy to think of it as exclusive (one or the other) rather than inclusive (both things). This is because of how the sentence is phrased.

You can fix this by adding a qualifier and expanding the second part of the sentence:

I am wondering if I have to write the paper about Canada only, or if I may write about some other countries as well.

A different qualifier could also be used:

I am wondering if I have to write the paper just about Canada, or if I may write about some other countries as well.


The qualifier of only or just makes it clear in the first part that it's Canada and nothing else that's being discussed. By repeating the if and write components in the second part, it adds clarity to the second option.

0

It's (as far as I know), grammatically sound, but it would benefit from a comma after "Canada" to make it easier to parse:

I am wondering whether I have to write the paper regarding Canada, or some other countries as well.

"Regarding" and "whether" also seem unnecessary, out of context. You can probably use "if" and "about" instead:

I am wondering if I have to write the paper about Canada, or some other countries as well.

0

I am wondering whether I have to write the paper regarding Canada or some other countries as well.

As a native speaker, this sounds... off. First off, the word "regarding" doesn't seem to fit here; the word "about" would sound more natural. "I'm asking a question about..." flows better than "I'm asking a question regarding..."

Then, going into "some other countries as well". The "as well" makes it sound like you're asking if it's just about Canada or Canada and other countries. You're probably looking for "instead" here. (If you're not, then leaving "as well" in there will work.)

Since you're wondering whether it has to be about Canada in particular, adding a "specifically" after "Canada" makes that clearer.

Then, this is optional, but adding in an "or if" makes it flow better to a native ear (at least in my opinion), although it's not strictly necessary. Once you're doing that, adding in what you're doing again (writing) makes it sound more correct.

The word "some" is unnecessary here; it's not serving any purpose.

So, if we take all of that into account, we get something like this...

I'm wondering whether I have to write the paper about Canada specifically, or if I can write about other countries instead.

...which sounds much more natural to my ears.

  • Thank you for your answer, but I can't figure out the difference between the use of as well and instead. in this case. Could you please give a little further explanation? – Young Dec 20 '18 at 1:29
  • @Young "as well" means "in addition" - this OR that. "instead" means "replacing" - this NOT that. – Mithical Dec 20 '18 at 6:18

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