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What is the grammatical role of "disposed of" in the following short-passage?

The worlds of science fiction abound with wonders. Yet modern technology progresses so rapidly that what is today's wild dream may be next year's kitchen appliance. A British scientist has prognosticated that within ten years every suburban abode will have its own robot servant. One task this domesticated automation will not have to contend with will be scouring the oven because even today the newest ranges can be programmed to reduce their own baked-on grime to easily disposed of ash.

Also, the following excerpt meaning is a little bit vague for me. Can you clarify it?

One task this domesticated automation will not have to contend with will be scouring the oven because even today the newest ranges can be programmed to reduce their own baked-on grime to easily disposed of ash.

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"Easily disposed of ash" means "ash that is easy to throw away".

"Dispose of" is a phrasal verb, specifically a prepositional verb. The participle "disposed" is used because "ash" is receiving the action.

Here's a simpler sentence with the same meaning:

Housekeeping robots will not have to scrub ovens, because some current ovens can turn sticky grime (which is hard to clean) into loose ash (which is easy to throw away).

In other words, robots won't have to clean ovens, because ovens already clean themselves.

  • Thank you. But what about "disposed of" grammatical viewpoint? – M. Afrashteh Dec 20 '18 at 19:39
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    @M.Afrashteh edited – Tashus Dec 20 '18 at 20:06
  • My mean is why it has 'd' at the end. – M. Afrashteh Dec 20 '18 at 20:21
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    @M.Afrashteh Because the ash is receiving the action (being disposed of) rather than performing the action (disposing of something else). It is a participle showing the passive construction. – Tashus Dec 20 '18 at 20:31

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