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In the following sentence, I have a few problems:

A tinge of garlic is all that's necessary in most recipes.

1) What is the exact meaning of the tinge?

2) What does mean the "all that's" and what is such a structure grammar?

3) Must we use "in" or "for" in the specified position? The Grammarly takes an error and says it should be replaced with "for"!

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    "All that" is not a constituent. "All" is called a 'fused determiner-head'. It combines the functions of determiner and head, and is best interpreted as "everything", as in "A tinge of garlic is everything [that's necessary in most recipes]", where "that" is a subordinator introducing the bracketed relative clause. – BillJ Dec 22 '18 at 10:52
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    It's easy to understand that 'tinge' is intended to show a small amount, but it sounds a bit strange. It is not a word commonly used to show small quantities. I expect native speakers would more commonly use one of bit, dash, pinch, touch, or trace. – Ross Murray Dec 22 '18 at 11:26
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1) What is the exact meaning of the tinge?

From dictionary.com:

verb (used with object), tinged, tinge·ing or ting·ing.
to impart a trace or slight degree of some color to; tint.
to impart a slight taste or smell to.

You should carefully consider various dictionary definitions before asking about the meaning of a word. :-) Or say why the dictionary definition is confusing.

2) What does mean the "all that's" and what is such a structure grammar?

Meaning:

"A tinge of garlic is all that's necessary" means

"All that's necessary is a tinge of garlic"
"All that's necessary is a small amount of garlic"
"Only a small amount of garlic is needed"

Grammar:

"A tinge of garlic is all that's necessary" is the same as
"A tinge of garlic is all that is necessary", which could be understood as
"A tinge of garlic is all (that is necessary)"

"all" is a predicate noun or predicate nominative. Like "Mr. Smith is a doctor" where "doctor" is a predicate noun.

The word "that" is a subordinating conjunction. "that is necessary" is an adjective clause modifying "all".

3) Must we use "in" or "for" in the specified position? The Grammarly takes an error and says it should be replaced with "for"!

Either "in" or "for" could possibly be used here. The word "in" might even be more preferable for this exact context than "for".

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    @BillJ , you had commented "-1 for calling it an adjective clause." Yet on the internet are numerous references which say "Adjective clauses can also be called relative clauses." They are to some extent the same thing. At least when in an adjectival role. Is that not the case here? – Sam Dec 22 '18 at 13:17

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