0

I am wondering to see if they mean the same or different.

"Did you get one of the papers?" "Yes I got one" or "yes I got it"

"I missed one event day" or " I missed an event today"

"Can I have one hamburger, please" or "Can I have a hamburger, please"

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Dec 23 '18 at 15:24

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

0

We use a/an to talk about one person or thing. So, yes, your sentences mean the same thing (the pair ones, I mean). Just remember that when you decide to use one instead of a/an, it may sound like you do it on purpose, perhaps, to put a special emphasis on the number. Compare:

Can I have a hamburger? (there is no emphasis on the number of hamburgers + you may mean any kind of hamburger)

Can I have one hamburger? (one, and not two or three)

  • 2
    You haven’t addressed the “yes I got it” part of the question. – Jim Nov 20 '18 at 0:05
  • And then there's "I've got it!!", shouted on a baseball field. – Hot Licks Dec 20 '18 at 0:45
0
"Did you get one of the papers?" "Yes I got one" or "yes I got it"

Here the question is specifically about any one of papers(among all the papers). Hence "Yes I got one" will be more perfect that "Yes I got it", since it referring to a particular paper but One referring to any one among the all papers.

"I missed one event day" or " I missed an event today"

"Can I have one hamburger, please" or "Can I have a hamburger, please"

In both the above examples using One and An will give same meaning and using An/A based on the Vowels will be more perfect than simply using an.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy