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I heard someone say I'm at a very good doctor. at doctor's office. I think they mean the doctor is very well-known and good at thier job. I want to know if the expression 'be at a good doctor' is commonly used because when I looked it up, I didn't see any result. Thank you in advance!

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    Are you sure they didn't say "I'm at a very good doctor's"? – Tushar Raj Dec 24 '18 at 16:09
  • Agree with @TusharRaj. A more complete sentence would sound like this: 'I am at a very good doctor's office'. – raleigh Dec 24 '18 at 16:16
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    “I’m at the doctor(’s)” is a common expression, and “a very good doctor” is a perfectly normal and unremarkable noun phrase. The combination of the two is not common, but perfectly natural. It’s not an expression in itself. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 24 '18 at 16:17
  • In Britain, the phrase "a doctor's office" is not usual - the place where a GP works is referred to as a/his/her/their surgery (even if their work is never surgical). At a very good doctor's strikes me as normal, but At a very good doctor's surgery,though possible, would be focussing on where the person physically is, not on seeing the very good doctor. – Colin Fine Dec 24 '18 at 20:20
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"I’m at the doctor(’s)" is a common expression, and "a very good doctor" is a perfectly normal and unremarkable noun phrase. The combination of the two is not common, but perfectly natural. It’s not an expression in itself. - (from comments section above)

Even if "doctor's" is more proper English than "doctor", it may be abbreviated in everyday speech.

When combining the two phrases as done here "I'm at a very good doctor", the abbreviation is advantageous because it eliminates any ambiguity (however small) that "good" applies to the "office", rather than the "doctor", since "office" isn't mentioned. It also removes any confusion about the difference between "doctor's" and the plural "doctors", in a quick spoken phrase. So, by simplifying and reducing verbiage, it's clearer.

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