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I asked for help in some website. some one gave me advice.

I want to tell him that his advice has helped me and I will use it.

so

  • Thanks I definitely will take your advice, and hope to get it done soon.
  • Thanks I'm definitely taking your advice, and hope to get it done soon.

  • Thanks I definitely take your advice, and hope to get it done soon.

  • Thanks I definitely took your advice, and hope to get it done soon.

which is correct? and what the meaning of each? thanks for help!

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*To take** advice is generally interpreted as accepting it.

To put that advice into practice is to act on it, to follow it or to implement it.

So you can tell your adviser that I will (definitely) take your advice... or I am (definitely) taking your advice...

Note that it's more idiomatic to place the modifier definitely between the modal will and the main verb take although definitely will take is not wrong.

So your second example is the most idiomatic although the first is also correct. Example three is possible but awkward. You might also argue for example four but the use of the past tense does not work as well in this context as you have not yet followed the advice.

A typical construction would be:

I have taken/will take your advice and hope to follow/implement/act on it soon.

  • As a footnote, I don’t think the second part goes well with “I have taken”, although it works very well with “I will take”. – J.R. Dec 25 '18 at 3:11

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