1

Everywhere I have read that the correct preposition is on for weekdays.

Would it still be OK to say: "Monday is the hardest in weekdays"?

4
  • No, it would not be OK. Not only would it be wrong; it would make no sense. Commented Dec 27, 2018 at 23:51
  • You could say, "Monday is the hardest weekday."; "Monday is the hardest of all weekdays."; even possibly "Monday is the hardest among weekdays." [not "in weekdays"] (But that last one sounds kind of weird, and it would be better as, "Monday is the hardest among all the weekdays.") .... "Why?" is sometimes a question no one can answer when it comes to language.
    – Lorel C.
    Commented Dec 28, 2018 at 0:00
  • 1
    We would more naturally say "Monday is the hardest weekday", but if you must use a partitive phrase, then "Monday is the hardest of the weekdays" would be fine.
    – BillJ
    Commented Dec 28, 2018 at 8:16
  • @YasinO - We appreciate your gratitude,, but please read through this meta post. That way, you'll know why some of your comments keep disappearing.
    – J.R.
    Commented Dec 28, 2018 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

1

Your sentence makes no sense.

I assume you mean:

Monday is the hardest weekday

That would mean you are very busy on Monday and it is the hardest day that is a weekday.

You could also say

Monday is the hardest of the weekdays.

or even

Monday is the hardest of weekdays.

2
  • Thanks a lot. So, it better be "hardest of all weekdays". But still I'm inclined to say "Monday is the hardest of the weekdays" . I don't why . By trying "in", I think, I wanted to reach "among" or "in its category, group, etc" . Commented Dec 28, 2018 at 0:30
  • I don't know where this notion comes from that the sentence "makes no sense" (said in this answer, and said once in the comments, too). Sure, it's not idiomatic, and it sounds off to me, also, but I can still make sense of it. Maybe I've had enough set theory in my past to get it? To my ear, the OP's sentence reads like: "Monday is the hardest in (the set of) weekdays." Of course of would be better, and my preferred wording might have no preposition at all (Monday is the hardest weekday), but "makes no sense" seems a bit harsh. We don't parse English like a compiler parses code.
    – J.R.
    Commented Dec 28, 2018 at 18:46

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .