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Reading this article explaining about the difference between "apply for " and "apply to",

https://www.dailywritingtips.com/apply-to-apply-for-and-apply-with/

I am still puzzled about why the correct sentence is

Winston is applying to the teaching program at Harvard.

not

Winston is applying for the teaching program at Harvard.

Is not the teaching program that Winston wants? Winston wants to obtain the teaching program so he "apply for" it.

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Just as your cited article says:

Winston is applying to Harvard.

Winston is applying for teaching certification.

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  • So it is correct to say "Winston is applying for the teaching program at Harvard." – NoNames Dec 28 '18 at 14:43
  • Err, no, "Winston is applying to the teaching program at Harvard. He is applying for a teaching degree." – Peter Dec 28 '18 at 14:51
  • My basic understanding is that you "apply to (somewhere)" while you "apply for (something)". – user3169 Dec 29 '18 at 6:09
  • My understanding is that one apply to an "institute," so the teaching program is, in a sense, an organization that deals with teaching degrees, am I right? – NoNames Dec 29 '18 at 13:53

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