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If you want to say/convey you are working on a book/paper, what is the correct way of saying so other than plainly saying I'm writing a book?

I noticed 'under writing' has a specific meaning and cannot be applied here. I also thought about, under composition (composing?) but I'm not sure if that's the correct term.

I'm writing an email to a possible colleague, and I want to sound formal and not too generic. that's why I'm asking this.

By the way, if it's not clear, from where I got the idea for under+ing, it came from 'under construction'.

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  • Why the secrecy? Especially with a possible colleague. If you’re working on a book or paper say so. It doesn’t sound like the start of a healthy relationship. – Jim Dec 29 '18 at 4:13
  • what about it? there is no secret here. He knows about it. I'm just asking about a term that I can use and sound formal. that's it. – Breeze Dec 29 '18 at 4:15
  • Oh, it sounded to me like you didn’t want to say you were writing a book. – Jim Dec 29 '18 at 4:17
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    "I'm currently doing a project on that." Avoids "writing" at the expense of getting a little bit stiff. – Wayfaring Stranger Dec 29 '18 at 5:32
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    You could say that you're "in the process of writing" a book. – ralph.m Dec 29 '18 at 7:46
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to pen Vocabulary.com

produce a literary work

As in:

Dear X; As you are aware, my book is under the pen and I would ...

and

Dear X; As you are aware, my book being under pen and paper, I desire your ...

and

Human editors at Amazon pen many of the answers. ReutersDec 21, 2018

and

Mattis then penned a fairly pointed resignation letter the following day. FoxNews Dec 21, 2018

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    From your own link, "under the pen" means undergoing revisions, not necessarily "being written". – Mark Beadles Dec 29 '18 at 16:17
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    being revised means not being written? – lbf Dec 29 '18 at 16:21

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