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This is a request of help for the connotations of a word

If native speakers hear the word, pedantry, does it assume an air of showy, academically pompous, impudent impression to them?

Would this word or these words, pedantry or pedant, mean a person who is excessively fussy on academic minutia and thus a bit irritable to us?

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    What do you mean by "does it (the word) assume an air"? Are you asking whether the listener would regard the person who used that word as pompous, or if the word has that meaning? Also, you should use the word in a sentence. Context is hardly irrelevant when asking about "airs". We should seek to avoid pedantry is far different from Your work offers no new insights and is nothing but pedantry – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 30 '18 at 11:51
  • Sorry for the lack of my good presentation. As a matter of fact, >" Are you asking whether the listener would regard the person who used that word as pompous, or if the word has that meaning?" Yes I am and it does.Anyway, thanks. – Kentaro Tomono Dec 30 '18 at 12:06
  • One who uses the word pedantry is not a pedant merely for doing so. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 30 '18 at 12:08
  • What would that possibly mean by your saying so? Would you kindly break it down a little bit? Thanks. – Kentaro Tomono Dec 30 '18 at 12:15
  • Sorry, I do not understand your question about "by your saying so". Are you referring to the phrase "merely for doing so" in my comment above? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 30 '18 at 12:20
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... and thus a bit irritable to us?

No, there is nothing about the definition of pedant or pedantry that relates to people's reactions to the behavior, just as there is nothing about the definition of murder that relates to the way people react to it.

And words do not "assume airs". Speakers assume airs.

The basic meanings of those words can be found in good dictionaries.

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