2
  1. The US agreed to postpone a tariff hike on $200 billion of imports from China until March 1 as both sides try to strike a deal over issues such as the alleged theft of intellectual property and technology, trade barriers, and the trade deficit.
  2. The US agreed to postpone a tariff hike on $200 billion worth of imports from China until March 1 as both sides try to strike a deal over issues such as the alleged theft of intellectual property and technology, trade barriers, and the trade deficit.
  3. The US agreed to postpone a tariff hike on $200 billion in imports from China until March 1 as both sides try to strike a deal over issues such as the alleged theft of intellectual property and technology, trade barriers, and the trade deficit.
  4. The US agreed to postpone a tariff hike on imports worth $200 billion from China until March 1 as both sides try to strike a deal over issues such as the alleged theft of intellectual property and technology, trade barriers, and the trade deficit.

I have saw, or precisely speaking, roughly recalled the above four ways to express the same thing. I am thirsty for an answer to the question of which one is right, as this has puzzled me for a long time.

2
+50

I personally don't see any significant differences in meaning among all examples you've given, other than the fact that different words are used.

If we compare for example:

  • dollars of imports
  • dollars in imports
  • dollars worth of imports

We get these results from Google NGram Viewer.

We can see they are all used, with none of the three being extremely more frequent than any other.

These results aren't intended in any way to argue my opinion that they mean largely the same thing in your example sentences; I've just given it for your own reference.

You can also see the results for:

  • dollars of damage
  • dollars in damage
  • dollars worth of damage

If we look to dictionaries for definitions of preposition "of" which fit the uses in your sentences.

of
prep
3.used after words or phrases expressing quantities:
a pint of milk.
Collins Dictionary

of
preposition (AMOUNT)
​A1 used after words or phrases expressing amount, number, or a particular unit:
a kilo of apples
a speck of dust
a drop of rain
Cambridge Dictionary

I've tried finding an entry for preposition "in" to match the above structures, but couldn't find one. However, prepositions can begin adverbial phrases, such as in the following examples:

  • I will sit [in silence].
  • a pound [in weight].
  • He is the leader [in name only].

If we use NGram viewer to see the results for:

a pound of weight
and
a pound in weight

We see that they have roughly the same frequency. As far as I can see, "in weight" is an adverbial phrase modifying "pound". In the case of "of weight", many would say this is a genitive construction, as in:

  • The rights of man.

Where the rights are possessed by man. However in the case of "a pound of weight" it's a stretch or I'd say untenable to say that the pound is possessed by (the) weight. Luckily most definitions of the genitive case don't strictly limit it to possession, even though some mix up the two as being the same:

genitive
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case expressing possession, measurement, or source.
American Heritage Dictionary

Regardless of identifying what constructions they actually are (I'm not exactly sure), to answer your question as to what the differences are among your four examples, I really don't see a significant difference.

Note there is a difference when saying a part of a whole. Notice how in this article it uses both "in" and "of" and notice when it does so:

That was $2.3 trillion in exports and $2.9 trillion in imports of both goods and services.
...
More than 80 percent of U.S. imports are goods.
...
Slightly less than a quarter of imports are industrial machinery and equipment.
...
Services make up 18 percent of imports.
thebalance.com article

You notice it used "of" when talking about a part of a whole, such as a percent or a "quarter".

However when saying something like "x dollars in/of/worth of imports/exports", you'll see all variations, and I don't see a difference in these cases:

President Trump announced Monday that he is ordering 10 percent tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China.
NPR article

U.S. finalizes next China tariff list targeting $16 billion in imports
Headline of Business Insider article

On Monday, President Donald Trump's administration announced it will impose 10 percent tariffs on about $200 billion of imports from China effective Sept. 24.
CNBC article

U.S. President Donald Trump has told aides he wants to move ahead on a plan to impose tariffs on Chinese imports worth $200 billion next week...
Reuters article

Here four different news articles use each of the four variations you have in your examples. And you will find innumerable examples of these variations in a search. I very much doubt many people would claim that these mean different things, or that any are incorrect. At least that's what I think.

Note: I'm not saying I don't see any difference in general between these constructions, only that in the the specific contexts that you've provided I see little if no difference in meaning. Whether there's a difference among "a pound of weight", "a pound in weight" or "a pound worth of weight", my feeling about that may be more nuanced.

Hope all of that was at least some help.

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