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Here is what I have found in Crash Course US history at 13 minute and 4 second, and it really confused me.

Whereas if you are an american arguably the most important thing the leader of this era ever did was raise George W Bush.

The reason I am baffled is that the parts of the sentence don't seem to me to agree. Would it be more grammatical if said:

...ever did was raising...

or

...ever did was raised...?

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The complement in this pattern is a clause headed by a non-finite form of the verb, thus (to) raise or raising.

The best thing we can do is to lower the tax on bubble gum.

The best thing we can do is lower the tax on bubble gum.

The best thing we can do is lowering the tax on bubble gum.

The best thing any leader of this era ever did was lower the tax on bubble gum.

Stylistically the ing-form is considered a little clunky there, and the marked infinitive is regarded by many as better here than the unmarked. But all three forms are used by native speakers.

Alternatively a clause with a finite verb with subject repeated:

The best thing we can do is we lower the tax on bubble gum.

The best thing he can do is he lowers the tax on bubble gum.

This form is colloquial.

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