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I was wondering if the word "will" needs to be repeated in two dependent clauses with two distinct subjects in the future tense.

For example: "There will come a day when wars will cease and peace will reign forevermore."

Is it grammatically permissible to omit the second "will" so that the sentence reads, "There will come a day when wars will cease and peace reign forevermore"?

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Yes, with a change

There will come a day when wars will cease and peace reigns forevermore.

By dropping the second "will" you are changing the tense from simple future to present tense. This means you'll need to add an "s" to the verb.

You could also drop all but the very first "will" (in fact, stylistically, it is stronger):

There will come a day when wars cease and peace reigns forevermore.

  • The "future continuous" would be something like, "Tomorrow we will be shopping all day". "... wars will cease and peace will reign" is the simple future. Also it's perfectly fine to say "... when wars will cease and peace reign", as "reign" is short for "will reign". Changing the conjugation separates the two actions, which might not be what the writer wants. – Andrew Jan 2 '19 at 19:06
  • @Andrew. You're right. I called it the wrong tense. I'll fix that. But peace is singular. It needs to be "reigns" not "reign." You would never say "peace reign." – Rykara Jan 2 '19 at 19:12
  • Just to clarify: You would never say "peace reign" in this particular example. In a non indicative mood, "peace reign" may well be correct.To wit: "Let peace reign" (imperative mood). – Rykara Jan 2 '19 at 20:05

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