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When you wish someone to have a good weekend, you say, "Have a good weekend!". But what about wishing someone to have good holidays? Does "have good holidays" sound weird? I'm just asking because I have never heard it before. I have only heard "Happy holidays!".

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  • Are you really asking 'does it sound weird?' (to which the answer is probably 'yes'), or seeking an explanation of why it sounds weird? If the latter, the question should make that clear. – jsw29 Jan 4 at 1:54
  • @jsw29 okay, now you got me wondering why it sounds weird, I mean, it does sound weird to me as well, because I've never heard it before. But if there's an explanation that suggests anything other than the fact that this usage is rare I'd be glad to hear it. – Happy Jan 4 at 2:00
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It seems to me that it is better to say not "Have good holidays!", but "Have a good holiday!". This form is much more natural and common.

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    I think you are missing the point. I want to refer to multiple holidays. For example Christmas and New Year. – Happy Jan 4 at 0:10
  • @Happy, in this case only "Happy holidays!" sounds good. – Ivan Olshansky Jan 4 at 0:13
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    Alternatively, you might say "I hope you enjoy the holidays!" or "Best wishes over the holidays!". As Ivan notes, "Have good holidays" is not used. – Chemomechanics Jan 4 at 0:27
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(language is living and changing) If you start saying it maybe be others will say it too to say and it will become used. lot of used habits and sound weird! we say „morning“ and mean „good morning“ but but actually we want to say: I wish you (might/will) have a good morning.

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You can use "Happy holidays!" or "Have a good holiday." instead of "Have good holidays." because "Have good holidays" sound weird and very rarely used. Actually I didn't hear it from someone since I born :).

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