1

I saw this news on the site, I would like to understand why this or that article is used. Grammarly also highlights the error " ̶a̶ credit" The first option was used on the site.

  1. Pete Rosenberg claims G.O.O.D. Music “forgot” to give him a credit for his melody on the hook.

  2. Pete Rosenberg claims G.O.O.D. Music “forgot” to give him a credit for his melody on a hook.

2

A "hook" is a catchy part of a song meant to draw attention and stick in people's mind. Usually a song only has one hook, so the definite article is used to refer to the hook for this particular song.

The "melody on the hook" is the melody that plays during the hook.

  • But " melody on the hook" doesn't seem to make sense, so I can't see how it applies to the example. – user3169 Jan 5 at 1:34
  • @user3169 Does my edit help? – Tashus Jan 5 at 2:04
  • Now I understand it. If the phrase is an idiom you might add that, which automatically eliminates using "a" – user3169 Jan 5 at 5:04
  • @user3169 It can be "a hook", just not in this sentence. It depends on which article any noun would take in the context. – Tashus Jan 5 at 5:18

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