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I have method A. This method has a limitation in high-dimension cases. This limitation leads method A to lose its flexibility in high-dimension. Therefore, there is method B, which overcomes the limitation of method A.

I would like to say that:

Method B overcomes the limitation (of method A) of losing the flexibility in high-diemension

I feel that the grammar of my sentence is wrong. How could I present my sentence in a correct way?

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  • There's nothing wrong with the grammar, but it is a bit awkward. I would probably say "Method B overcomes the limitation of method A, whereby flexibility is lost in high dimension"; but that's still somewhat awkward.
    – Colin Fine
    Jan 9, 2019 at 17:56

1 Answer 1

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You might try:

Method A is limited by its loss of flexibility in a high dimension but Method B overcomes this limitation.

Method B is not limited by a loss of flexibility in a high dimension like Method A is.

Method B overcomes the loss of flexibility in a high dimension that limits Method A.

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  • I should lose the is at the end of your second sentence - or replace like with as. Jan 9, 2019 at 18:48

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