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I wonder what this is: who it is and what it is. Does it mean whoever it is and whatever it is? And I don't understand how this is translated : “With respect to Western ideals and who it is and what it is we stand for as Americans, Russia poses the most dangerous threat to that way of life,”

Quoted from “With respect to Western ideals and who it is and what it is we stand for as Americans, Russia poses the most dangerous threat to that way of life,” Ms. Page told investigators for a joint House Judiciary and Oversight Committee investigation into Moscow’s election interference

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  • You can expand "who it is and what it is we stand for as Americans" to "who it is [we stand for as Americans] and what it is we stand for as Americans". – Lawrence Jan 12 at 12:24
  • Thank you Lawrence. Then I think "with respect to.......... what it is we stand for" means that way of life. Is it correct? – Mankak Jan 12 at 13:01
  • See definition 3 under "stand for": Support (a cause or principle) [- ODO]. – Lawrence Jan 12 at 13:16
  • Yes, or at least very nearly so. The phrase "that way of life" represents the way of life associated with Western ideals, and with the people and principles that Americans support. – Gary Botnovcan Jan 12 at 14:10

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