1

‘The owner, Keenan Wynn, has got it bad for his waitress Kotty (Terry Moore), but she only has eyes for for a research professor (Frank Lovejoy).’

I've seen the sentence from Oxford dictionary. I'm not sure if it's just a typo. I don't feel it needs two 'for's there. Any thoughts?

closed as off-topic by Tᴚoɯɐuo, choster, Nathan Tuggy, Jason Bassford, snailboat Jan 13 at 18:50

  • This question does not appear to be about learning the English language within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the text has a printing error. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 13 at 13:42
3

The sentence in the Oxford Dictionary example:

‘The owner, Keenan Wynn, has got it bad for his waitress Kotty (Terry Moore), but she only has eyes for for a research professor (Frank Lovejoy).’

The repetition of 'for' is wrong, and is very probably a typing error.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.