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Could somebody explain me why we use reasonably instead of reasonable:

The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so.

Quite confuse this grammar.

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  • Adjectivally, raising the rent was reasonable. Adverbially, we'd often include an "intensifier", such as very, quite - which in a less "florid, poetic" word order might be expressed as The landlord quite reasonably raised the rent. Jan 15, 2019 at 13:50
  • Your specific example is a bit "literary / florid", but it's perfectly natural even in relaxed speech to use this construction in contexts such as X did Y, and rightly so (speaker thinks that Y was the right thing for X to do). Jan 15, 2019 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

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Your sentence:

The landlord raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and REASONABLY so...

may be an idiomatic.

"reasonably" may also modify "and so", depending on context.

Examples:

  1. The landlord raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and so, the tenants were unhappy.

"and so" is a conjunction that describes whatever comes after depends on and is affected by whatever comes before.

  1. The landlord raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so, the tenants were unhappy.

This is like the above example, but the speaker is agreeing or empathizing with the tenant's unhappiness.

  1. The landlord raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so!

This is an idiomatic use. It means that the speaker empathizes with or agrees with the landlord's decision.

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  • I confuse the pharase REASONABLY SO because I dont know its meaning. Could you explain it again sit
    – farm4fame
    Jan 15, 2019 at 13:14
  • It depends on the context. Sometimes, "thus" or "therefore" is the meaning. Sometimes, it is used to express that the speaker is agreeing with the statement.
    – Double U
    Jan 15, 2019 at 13:15
  • so This example AND SO is repeat the full sentences and that act REASONABLY right, Sir?
    – farm4fame
    Jan 15, 2019 at 13:18
  • @farm4fame I edited my response.
    – Double U
    Jan 15, 2019 at 13:22
  • I understand clearly now. Thank you my teacher. How can I vote you. I did but error need 15 reputation
    – farm4fame
    Jan 15, 2019 at 13:26
0

What would "reasonable" modify? 

In the phrasing "and reasonably so", I understand the word "so" to represent the earlier phrase "raised the monthly rent". 

The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so. 
The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and raised it reasonably. 

The adverb "reasonably" works with a verb like "raised" or a complete predicate like "raised the monthly rent".  It still works well when the anaphor "so" represents that kind of thing. 

Adjectives like "reasonable", on the other hand, tend to work with nouns.  I can't spot any noun or noun-like thing which the adjective "reasonable" might modify. 

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