1

"This confirms that we rely on goods made overseas for products that Japanese consumers buy," adding that "despite the weak yen, Japanese manufacturers are not coming back."

I think "for products" is redundant, and it should be omitted. I parse this sentence as following:

This confirms that we rely on goods( made overseas) (that Japanese consumers buy)," adding that "despite the weak yen, Japanese manufacturers are not coming back."

I think two parts in bold above are modified "goods".

  • I read that part in the original sentence as: We rely on goods made overseas. And we rely so for products that Japanese consumers buy. – Damkerng T. Mar 18 '14 at 4:24
1

The statement seems to talk about the same things as both 'goods' and 'products'. However, this may mean the goods are then made into the products that are bought.

Thus, the answer depends on context. If the goods are different to the products (they may be, they may not be) it cannot be omitted, but otherwise it can be.

1

I parsed that statement as follows (paraphrased for clarity):

For the products that Japanese consumers buy, we rely on goods made overseas.

Interpreted in this way, the for products is not redundant, as you can see. Moreover, your modified statement implies that Japanese consumers buy the goods made overseas, which is not intended in the original statement.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.