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Is the usage of the verbs "measured & compared" correct in the following sentence?

We will assess network performance in this regard measured compared to the protocol which hops over other nodes

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Michael Rybkin, user3169, Hellion, Varun Nair Jan 18 at 12:06

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    Stylistically it's a bit clumsy to include measured - which adds nothing to the intended meaning, since you obviously couldn't compare performances unless you somehow "quantified, measured" them. Note that it's almost impossible to make a syntactic case for the two words measured compared occurring consecutively without intervening and like that (it's certainly not valid in your exact context). Presumably the bit about in this regard refers back to some specific aspect of measurable performance introduced in preceding text. – FumbleFingers Jan 15 at 16:58
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    (Credible example: We graphed the speed measured compared to the speed claimed in the documentation.) – FumbleFingers Jan 15 at 17:05
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    The sentence is ungrammatical with those two verbs; moreover, I have no clear idea what you are hoping to say. How can you compare performance to a protocol? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 15 at 17:59
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo: Presumably, the comparison is to the (measured?) network performance (in this regard?), of some other system, which is configured to use the "node-hopping" protocol. Whatever that means. – FumbleFingers Jan 15 at 18:26
  • "in this regard measured" =? "so measured" – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 15 at 20:09
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Why not something like this, using compare as the main verb?

We will compare the performance of the network in this respect to that of a network which uses the "node-hopping" protocol.

... or whatever you'd like to call it.

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You are already using "assess", which here means the same thing as "measured". Using just "compared" would read better than "measured compared".

That gives:
"We will assess network performance in this regard compared to the protocol which hops over other nodes"

It is also odd to use "in this regard" for the current design\protocol and compare to another "protocol". So I would recommend using:
"We will assess network performance for this protocol compared to the protocol which hops over other nodes"

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We will assess network performance in this regard measured compared to the protocol which hops over other nodes

It doesn't scan as written, as a general rule (there's always exceptions!) if using two verbs together the second verb should take the infinitive form so the above would become:

We will assess network performance in this regard measured to compare to the protocol which hops over other nodes

but that doesn't really work either, it's legal grammar but doesn't scan particularly well.

We will assess network performance in this regard compared to the protocol which hops over other nodes

"compared" implies some form of measurement taking place in process of comparing. If you wanted to be referring to pre-existing measurements being used you would use:

We will assess measured network performance in this regard measured compared to the protocol which hops over other nodes

It gets you around the infinitive issue.

  • I don't find your first (...measured to compare...) alternative remotely acceptable. – FumbleFingers Jan 15 at 17:06
  • @FumbleFingers you know what, reading it back I really have to agree with you. – motosubatsu Jan 15 at 17:09
  • @FumbleFingers Might I suggest that what OP means is "assess performance ... measured in comparison to ...". That's not a felicitous way of putting it, either--assess and measure are really redundant. I'd say "measure .. in comparison to" – StoneyB Jan 15 at 17:54
  • @StoneyB: Indeed. However we attempt to parse things, it seems we're dealing with inherently clunky phrasing. Within which context we've also got to keep track of whatever in this regard refers back to. Maybe it would be better for OP to just forget about trying to include so many different referents and relationships in a single sentence. Perhaps the way forward is something along the lines of Write whatever you're trying to say as a long series of very short sentences, then see if you can usefully collapse any of it into more complex sentences. – FumbleFingers Jan 15 at 18:18

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