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I read in an article this sentence:

Anyone who's ever pushed themselves to get to the next level or accomplish something knows that when you really challenge yourself, you can turn up amazing results.

What does "turn up" exactly mean in this context?

  • Can you provide a link to the source of that sentence or add anything about the subject matter of the source? It is hard to say what the phrase means in "this context", as you have not really provided the context, only a sentence. Are you sure that the phrase was "turn up" and not "turn out"? – Tashus Jan 17 at 20:37
  • "Anyone who's ever pushed themselves to get to the next level or accomplish something knows that when you really challenge yourself, you can turn up amazing results." Turn up came in this context. And here's the link lifehacker.com/… – Riman Houbbi Jan 17 at 21:16
  • In other words, produce. – Jason Bassford Jan 17 at 21:35
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To turn up something means to discover it.

phrasal verb

If you turn something up or if it turns up, you find, discover, or notice it.

Investigations have never turned up any evidence.

Turn up (Collins Dictionary)

In British English, 'turn up' with a direct object is used figuratively to mean 'produce, discover, or find' during an examination, search or investigation. Used literally, it means to bring something to the surface while digging in the soil. A detective might turn up some new facts while checking evidence in a case; a farmer might turn up buried treasure while digging in a field (while 'turning' or 'turning over' the soil).

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I believe "turn up" doesn't really take direct objects. Something can turn up, but you can't turn something up (not in the discovery sense).

Anyone who's ever pushed themselves to get to the next level or accomplish something knows that when you really challenge yourself, you can (produce/discover/achieve) amazing results.

The above is more correct. Alternatively,"amazing results can turn up", though that's more awkward.

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