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I have a question about pronunciation. I've been studying English practically for my whole life, but for some reason I have such a hard time pronouncing the FLAP T.

I do know how to make it perfectly, but whenever I try to pronounce it it sounds really forced and whenever I try to talk fast like If i want to say 'It was such a pretty day" or Whenever the 'PRETTY' word comes up I get so stucked! Don't even get me started on pronouncing words like "turtle, murder, or saying "ORDER TO".

I used to practice English like crazy when I was a kid and a teenager and even in adulthood, making the flap T, would be extremely easy, been practicing 3 hours daily for over 5 months with words like "murder, turtle and listening to native speakers saying it and repeating it with them". Still, CAN'T pronounce it properly and fluently. Why? Do I need to focus on "tongue exercises"? JAW exercises too? I don't know, This sound is giving me such a hard time, and sometimes I just feel like givin' up on English.

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    You'll probably get more traction for this question over on Language Learning. – Mitch Jan 12 at 22:03
  • Try "prit-ti" ,"tur-tul", 'mur-der", etc. There is no good reason to speak English with any great speed. Slow down. Many English speakers prefer words to come distinctly and not as if there were a race to see how many words per minute can be thrown out. – J. Taylor Jan 12 at 22:40
  • @Carlos Fernandez... I actually use the pronunciations I suggested at times. Another way I say "pretty" is "pur-di". Also "tur-dul". The real issue IS getting "stuck". Don't try to say something you cannot say. – J. Taylor Jan 12 at 22:49
  • I appreciate your comments. I do think the next. If you can't do something, you just dont have to give up. I had trouble with the American r sound but never give up and managed to say it. But thanks for your reply!! – Carlos Fernandez Jan 12 at 22:51
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    Don't worry about it Carlos, I'm British and I have difficulty hearing the differences between some of the examples I've found online of the pronunciation of a 'd' and a 'flapped t', let alone reproducing the difference! To me the word 'letter' pronounced by an American using a 'flapped t' sounds just like 'ledder', I suspect that if I told an American I'd had a 'ledder' from someone it would sound odd to him but, as I said I can't hear the difference between an American 'd' and a 'flapped t'. Don't let such a minor point spoil your study of the English language. – BoldBen Jan 13 at 8:48

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