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Tell me please which phrasing sounds more natural in the following context:

The necessary information can be found in the article with the title WALKING RECOVERY IN PATIENTS WHO SUFFERED A STROKE.

The necessary information can be found in the article with the title THE RECOVERY OF THE ABILITY TO WALK IN PATIENTS WHO SUFFERED A STROKE.

I am not sure any of the variants for the article title sounds native. Tell me please what would be the natural title for the article on relearning to walk after a stroke.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Jason Bassford, user3169, Davo, shin, M.A.R. ಠ_ಠ Feb 1 at 13:24

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Is the article intended for a lay audience, or specialists? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 21 at 11:53
  • Rather, for specialists – Dmytro O'Hope Jan 21 at 11:55
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Titles typically avoid restrictive relative clauses like "who have suffered a stroke"

Learning to Walk Again after a Stroke lay audience

You should check the intended journal and see if articles refer to "walking" or "ambulation". The title of an article for specialists might also avoid the word "stroke".

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