1

Is there any diffrence between sentences below?

1) It turned out that he lied all along.

2) The fact that he lied all along turned out.

Also:

3) It doesn’t interest me that he came late.

4) The fact that he came late doesn’t interest me.

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First of all, your comparative sentences are constructed differently, which can also change their meaning in ways other than can just adding a fact phrase.

In order for everything to be equal, they should be rephrased so that they are as close to identical as possible, aside from the one difference you have in mind:

It turned out that he lied all along.
It turned out to be a fact that he lied all along.

It doesn't interest me that he came late.
It doesn't interest me that it's a fact he came late.


When using the phrase a fact, you are putting more emphasis on something being real rather than fictional than you are on the thing being described.

This applies to both comparisons, but is more evident in the second.

It doesn't interest me that he came late.

This could mean that you don't care if he came late or early.

It doesn't interest me that it's a fact he came late.

This could mean that you're talking about your interest in the truth-value of a statement rather than the event itself. In other words:

It doesn't interest me if the statement of his having come late is true or not.

In this case, you're more interested in the validity of the thing. Somebody who wasn't friends with the person (and didn't care if they came at all, late or not) would probably use the version of the sentence without a fact. On the other hand, a police officer, not making a value judgment but simply wanting the actual facts about something, would be more likely to use the version of the sentence with a fact—even though, in this sentence, it seems they're more interested in the facts about something else.


To make my initial point about using identically phrased sentences aside from using a fact phrase, consider the following.

Both of these provide an objective statement:

It doesn't interest me that he came late.
It doesn't interest me that it's a fact he came late.

Both of these can suggest some level of negative emotion (dismissal, sarcasm, or irritation):

That he came late doesn't interest me.
The fact that he came late doesn't interest me.

In putting interest me at the end of the sentence rather than the beginning, it gives the speaker a kind of upset emotional tone. And this emotional tone exists even when fact isn't used at all. So analyzing the existence of fact as causing this tone is misleading. It's not the phrase itself that provides the tone, it's the ordering of the sentence.

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From the first glance, I would say there is big difference in what is emphasized in the sentence. The overall meaning seems equal to me since the same information is communicated. The emphasis is however put either on that fact that you talk about or the reaction/outcome.

So depending on what I want to achieve saying these, I would choose the version. If I am angry that the person was late and I want to complain to somebody, I would go for "The fact that he came late doesn’t interest me." than the other version. It is pointing to person being late more than to me being uninterested.

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    It is not clear what this answer is trying to say. In part, it seems completely wrong: "I am not interested" does not imply that I am angry. I may be angry, but the words do not imply it. In part, it seems just badly phrased. "Pressured" is not a synonym for "emphasized." This should be rwritten or deleted. – Jeff Morrow Jan 26 at 17:38

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