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priest was staring hard at something, so Quasimodo followed his gaze. A ladder stood against the gallows. A girl dressed in white was being carried up the ladder. There was a noose around her neck. Quasimodo gasped. It was Esmeralda! Once he reached the platform of the gallows, the man arranged the noose. Then he kicked away the ladder. Quasimodo could scarcely breathe. The girl was swinging from the end of the rope! The priest gave a terrible laugh—such as can come only from one who is not truly human. Quasimodo didn’t hear the laugh, but he saw it and understood. Without thinking, he rushed at the priest in fury and pushed Claude Frollo over the edge. Frollo landed on a narrow ledge before sliding down to a gutter. There he clung to a gargoyle and struggled to get a foothold. Quasimodo had only to stretch out his hand to pull Frollo back—but he didn’t even look at the priest. Instead, he was staring at the gypsy girl. His heart was crushed. A steady stream of tears flowed over his deformed face. At last, Frollo lost his grip. Quasimodo watched as he fell screaming to his death 200 feet below. Then he raised his eyes to look upon the gypsy girl. He could see her body, hanging from the gallows. It was twitching in the last struggles of death. Then, in utter despair, he looked down at the archdeacon. With a sob that shook deep in his chest, he cried out, “Oh, all that I ever loved! ” Quasimodo disappeared from Notre Dame that very evening.

How we can say this sentence in other words?

Does it mean: the Frollo was the only one who I loved in my life?

or: The only thing that kept me living now proved to be cruel man?

or: or all that kept me living now disappeared?

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    Quasimodo and his story are originally written in French, yes? Perhaps this is a consequence of the translation (it would make a lot of sense of the original quote was something like "O, tout que j'ai aimé dans ma vie!"). – user45266 Jan 28 at 2:25
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The phrase means exactly what the combination of the words mean: everything that he has loved, from his birth until now.

From the context, I assume he is lamenting the loss of the only thing he has ever loved—Esmerelda:

There was a noose around her neck. Quasimodo gasped. It was Esmeralda! . . . Instead, he was staring at the gypsy girl. His heart was crushed.


Quasimodo pushed Frollo to his death, so it's not him that he loved:

Without thinking, he rushed at the priest in fury and pushed Claude Frollo over the edge . . . Quasimodo had only to stretch out his hand to pull Frollo back—but he didn’t even look at the priest.


So, he lost all that he had loved—and disappeared from Notre Dame. What his disappearance means isn't made clear in the passage quoted. It's likely a matter of speculation more to do with literary criticism than just reading what's here.

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