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  1. All these stand testimony to China’s firm commitment in promoting China-ASEAN relations, which has also invigorated ASEAN’s other partnerships and played an exemplary role in advancing East Asia cooperation.
  2. All these stand a testament to China’s firm commitment in promoting China-ASEAN relations, which has also invigorated ASEAN’s other partnerships and played an exemplary role in advancing East Asia cooperation.

Is there any difference between "stand testimony to" and "stand a testament to" in this context?

2 Answers 2

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Both of them are wrong. You should write

All these stand as a testimony to China’s firm commitment ...

or

All these stand as a testament to China’s firm commitment ...

The latter sounds good but technically "testament" refers to a will (the document someone leaves when they die). There's a subtle implication that whatever "these" are, they are now dead and gone. Not everyone will be aware of this distinction, so it may not matter in your context.

Another alternative that is grammatical but not common is

All these testify to China’s firm commitment ...

Probably better would be

All these evince China’s firm commitment ...

or "show" or "demonstrate" if the context is less formal.

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  • I've never heard of "stand as a testimony to", but alright.
    – user45266
    Commented Jan 28, 2019 at 17:12
  • @user45266 But you can get the rough idea of stand as a testimony, right? Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 5:08
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    Well, yes, but I can also get the rough idea of a murder from "unlife someone", and that's obviously incorrect. If you want to say that, no one'll get upset, but I think it's best to at least warn the students about its invalidity for correct English standards.
    – user45266
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 5:11
  • @user45266 "Stand as a testimony" is legitimate modern English phrase that I have heard many times. The fact that you have not heard it does not mean that it is not correct, unlike "unlife someone," which is not a real phrase. "Stand as a testimony" is the closest correct approximation of what the OP asked about, though I do think my later examples are more common.
    – farnsy
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 20:58
  • @farnsy What part of the world are you from? I'm a native English speaker from the United States, and I'd argue that "stand as a testimony" is not a correct phrase either. Are you certain you weren't hearing "stand as testimony" or "stand as a testament"?
    – user45266
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 23:16
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Either "stand in testimony" or "are a testament of". Although I prefer the former.

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    Welcome to English Language Learners! Please explain why your answer is correct; answers without explanation don't teach the patterns of English well and may be deleted.
    – Glorfindel
    Commented Aug 24, 2020 at 10:43

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