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A few even have experience working with the United Nations.(https://ludwig.guru/s/experience+working+with) (https://www.forbes.com/1999/09/13/freeman_0913.html#338ea1d5720f)

I have experience going to England.

It seems like "working with the United Nations" actually modifies "experience".

So, I think that it could be parsed as "Experience is working with the United Nations".

If my thinking is correct, could you please bring me some sentences like this?

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  • @ Jason Bassford is "of" omitted between "experience" and "working"? Like "experience of working".
    – GKK
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 23:01
  • "Experience is working with the United Nations". Isn't there a typo--is instead of in?
    – Victor B.
    Commented Mar 8, 2019 at 14:11
  • On the contrary. The 'experience working', or 'experience working' is a wide-spread set expression, in which the noun 'experience' modifies the noun 'working'. It means 'to take some work deliberately to gain some necessary experience in a professional field.'
    – kngram
    Commented Dec 16, 2021 at 4:32
  • There are many examples on the Internet of similar sentences. Use "textranch" to learn these, for example.
    – kngram
    Commented Dec 16, 2021 at 5:08

3 Answers 3

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In all of the examples cited so far, you could consider the gerund to modify the noun, but you could also consider a preposition to be understood:

A few even have experience [[with/of]] working with the United Nations.

I have experience [[with/of]] going to England.

We had some difficulty [[with/in]] finding the address. (from Arcatera)

Here is a clearer example:

I hiked for five miles with this walking stick.

"Walking" is clearly not a participle, because the stick is not walking. It must be a gerund that describes what the stick is used for. There are plenty of similar examples: drinking fountain, divining rod, swimming hole, writing paper, recording studio, etc.

Those are all set phrases, but gerunds can also modify nouns in new ways. E.g.:

The guru has a meditating room in his house. (The room is used for meditating.)

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Yes, it can.

We had some difficulty finding the address. Here, difficulty is a noun and is followed by a gerund.

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Consider these three sentences:

I enjoy walking in the mountains
I have experience of walking in the mountains
I have experience walking in the mountains

In the first sentence, "walking in the mountains" is clearly a gerund phrase and is the direct object of enjoy. In the second sentence, "walking in the mountains is again a gerund phrase, and it is linked to the rest of the sentence by of: it effectively qualifies the kind of experience that you have. In the third sentence, "walking in the mountains" is a participial phrase which modifies experience.

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