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In the cooking video I'm trying to describe, a man (chef) is standing in front of the camera. He's standing at the table (i.e. there's a table before him). There's a cooker behind him. The man is going to turn (or turn away?) from the camera (i.e. from his viewers, from us) and step to (move to or come up to) the cooker behind him.

I've put the link to this video, the start time is 3:40. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVJoHEdfis8&t=223s . It may help understand better than my clunky explanation.

My questions are:

0) Is it a motion or movement or move I'm trying to describe?

1) Which one should I pick in the situation above: "turn from" or "turn away from" or "turn his back to" or anything else?

2) Is he going to "step to" or "move to" the cooker or anything different?

  • After some considerations (which might be wrong as well) I figured that “turn his back on” is something out of place in my case. As for “turn from” and “turn away from” – well, I’d rather choose the second one, but what confuses me is definitions like this one from Macmillan Dictionary: [turn away from something] to refuse to accept or to use something any longer Ex: Many shoppers turned away from products that were not environmentally friendly. macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/turn-away-from – Olga Feb 7 at 11:02
  • The meaning above is figurative (deny, reject, take down etc.). But can we use “turn away from” in its direct meaning? – Olga Feb 7 at 11:03
  • Here’s what I’ve found in Merriam-Webster, and it looks more like what I’m looking for: TURN (intransitive verb): merriam-webster.com/dictionary/turn 3a: to change position (as of one's head) so as to face another way Ex: everyone turned to stare b: to face toward or away from someone or something Ex: flowers turn toward the light But again, there's no "turn away from" collocation. – Olga Feb 7 at 11:04

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