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My friend had told me he didn't like eating fat. Yesterday he was relishing some pork belly with a lot of fat, so I asked, "Don't you not like eating fat?" He's a native speaker and I'm not. He understood it but it was very unfamiliar to me.

Google didn't turn up enough for me to decide. Is it correct? If not, what are some correct ways? "Don't you dislike eating fat" is all right, but I dislike this way if the other one is also correct. :)

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Feb 2 at 14:23

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  • Don't never use no double negative! – Hot Licks Feb 2 at 13:02
  • Compare Don't you think we should reschedule? Don't you think we shouldn't reschedule? Do you think we shouldn't reschedule? Do you think we should reschedule? Attempting to apply computer-like logic to infer the sense and expected answers to those questions can produce wrong answers because it ignores subtler cuing markers in human discourse. – tchrist Feb 2 at 14:21
  • I thought, you don't like eating fat. I thought, you dislike eating fat. – re_nez Feb 2 at 14:33
  • No joking: "My friend had told me he didn't like eating fat. Yesterday he was relishing some pork belly with a lot of fat, so I asked, "So you don't like eating fat, do you?" OR "So you like eating fat, don't you?" So, in answer to your question: Is it correct? My answer is: No, it isn't. – Lambie Feb 2 at 14:36

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