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When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along due to follow my parents' dreams.

I was taught due to has two meanings. When you use it as 'because of', nouns or gerunds should follow. On the other hand, you put it with Be-verb to talk about things that are expected in a way of 'be due to verb'. But I never saw this kind of due to (pic related). Could someone explain it please?

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It's not grammatical.

Keeping due to, it could be rewritten to something like one of the following—using a noun as you indicated:

When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along due to my parents following their dreams.
When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along due to my parents wanting to follow their dreams.


But there is no requirement to use the -ing form of a verb after due to either (so long as there is an intervening noun).

For instance, these sentences would also work:

When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along due to my parents who followed their dreams.
When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along due to my parents who wanted to follow their dreams.


However, all of those versions are a little bit awkward. Better versions of the sentence would replace due to with by:

When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along by my parents who followed their dreams.
When I was young, I was unwillingly brought along by my parents who wanted to follow their dreams.

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