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A: I don't think this room belongs to the house I had a meeting with X in (it).

B: Well, if you want to make sure of its belonging, then take a tour around the house.

Note: A and B are having a chat through the phone. X is another person.

As belong has many possible meanings, would it mean in B's sentence ...to make sure that the room belongs to the house?

I didn't find a similar example, but I found this:

Packed up all their belongings and moved across the country.

The meaning is understood as their luggage and possessions, and I don't want B's sentence to mean that in the singular form.

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  • To me, the sentence is awkward... source please
    – Maulik V
    Feb 4 '19 at 5:50
  • Its awkwardness happened for a reason; the dialogue is from my own words.
    – Tasneem ZH
    Feb 4 '19 at 6:10
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In A's sentence "belongs" is acceptable, but not particularly idiomatic. A native speaker might say

I don't think this room is part of the house where I had a meeting with X.

B's response stretches the use of "belong" beyond the breaking point. It is probably not grammatical and certainly not idiomatic. An idiomatic response might be

Well, if you want to be sure, take a tour of the house.

Sure of what, you may ask. Sure about whether it is the same house. Typically, conversations do not explicitly reiterate what is the current topic of conversation. If, however, B suspects that A is quite stupid, B could say

Well, if you want to know whether the room is part of the same house, take a tour of the house.

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Make sure of its belonging

This is grammatically correct, but sounds very unnatural. A much better way of phrasing this would be

Well, if you want to make sure it belongs, then take a tour around the house.

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