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"I love you now more than at the time we got married"

  • is the sentence correct?

"I love you now more than at the time since we got married"

  • what about this one?

Is there any difference in the meaning?

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"The time since we got married" refers to the elapsed period of time between "the time we got married" and "now". So you could say "I've grown to love you more over the time since we got married", though it would more usually get rendered in the shorter "I've grown to love you more since we got married".

"I love you now more than at the time we got married" is correct. However, it would be more naturally rendered "I love you more (now) than I did when we got married", or "I love you more (now) than when we got married". In both cases, now is optional because it is implied. This is because both "now" and "the time we got married" or "when we got married" refer to specific points in time, rather than a period of time.

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