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I saw my mom at home instead when she should have been at the Bank. She had a plan to go to the Bank. She told me that she was going to the Bank.

Actualy i want to ask her about her plan in second sentence

What she is doing at home when she had planed to go to bank

Should I say:

"What you are doing here. you had to go to bank, hand't you?"
Or
"What you are doing here. you were to go to bank, weren't you?"

Or should I say some thing else?

  • 2
    What are you doing here? You were supposed to go to the Bank. – Jim Mar 21 '14 at 6:34
  • Stop Indianizing there. I get upset when someone puts na (meaning hadn't you here) as a question tag! – Maulik V Mar 21 '14 at 6:38
  • @MaulikV: Don't get upset, some people do like it :) You should think of your heart na? :) – oerkelens Mar 21 '14 at 8:15
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I guess you are surprised by your mother's presence in the house and not bothered what is she doing inside the house.

So, keep it short -

Why are you here instead of (being in) the bank?

When you and her both know the bank's plan, you don't need to specify the event - you were supposed to. It's understood with the above-mentioned sentence.

After OP's edit

Okay, if you want to make her realize about her plan, tell...

Why are you here? You had a plan to go to the bank, handn't you?

After OP asking me in Hindi

What are you doing here? You were supposed to go to the Bank, weren't you? (Jim's comment).

  • Actualy i want to ask her about her plan in second sentence What she is doing at home when she had planed to go to bank – user4084 Mar 21 '14 at 7:01
  • @user4084 well, you added it now! – Maulik V Mar 21 '14 at 7:03
  • yes maulikv in hindi if i say "tum gharme kya kar rahe ho. tum to bank jane wale the na" how i would say it in English – user4084 Mar 21 '14 at 7:07
  • @user4084 Ah, that way. Go with Jim's comment. That translates this! – Maulik V Mar 21 '14 at 7:09

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