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I would like to write a sentence where I need to use ‘a' two times. I would like to know if my sentence is correct or not. In addition, based on a comment by @J.R., how could I use and/or with a past sentence?

Reference A used a sequential method and/or a joint method to determine the right model. \

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    That ‘and/or’ really messes up the sentence. You shouldn’t use ‘and/or’ with the past tense: It either used both methods, or else it used one or the other. (You could use the ‘and/or’ with the future: Reference A will use a sequential method and/or a joint method to determine the right model.) – J.R. Feb 7 at 12:07
  • I don't think the tense matters. Perhaps the speaker does not know which was used, but the evidence suggests that one or the other, or both were used. In that case, and/or is appropriate. – Adam Blomeke Feb 7 at 15:56
  • “...used sequential and joint methods...” – Morrison Bower Jul 19 at 13:05
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Regarding the question about using 'a' twice, it is fine to use this indefinite article either once ("...used a sequential method and/or joint method...") or twice ("...used a sequential method and/or a joint method..."). I think I would prefer just one 'a'. The second is understood/implicit.

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